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and puts dangerous weapons into the hands of criminals who essentially don't follow the law, something else that could be part of this legislation is creating a registry for any weapons that were obtained before this ban goes in place, and a speech this week one of the nra's eleader's's wayne lapierre says that was totally unacceptable to the nra. >> dianne feinstein's conference is scheduled for 11:00 a.m. eastern, about two hours from now. >>> the military is making a major change, for the first time in history women will be allowed to serve on the front lines but don't expect to see changes right away. pentagon correspondent chris lawrence tells us why. >> reporter: army infantry, marine recon, even special ops, on thursday, they all opened to women for the first time. the pentagon is eliminating its ban on women in combat, but there's a catch. did you know today's army would be so different than the one you joined? >> no. >> reporter: staff sergeant kelly rodriguez deployed three times to iraq and afghanistan and became one of the first female combat medics to work directly with special
it as -- as a level playing field. >> paul butler is a professor at georgetown law and a former federal prosecutor and a white collar defense attorney. wow, professor butler, where do i begin? all i could think of was how many people across the country were taking sides on how they felt about lance armstrong and how many lawyers were cringing thinking i would not want to be counsel for him right now? >> well, you know, people are saying, why would he do this, what was he thinking? and lawyers are the first people to be wondering what was he thinking? you know, he probably isn't going to do any jail time. he's not going to get locked up for what he said on oprah, but is he going to be liable for tens of millions of dollars in civil lawsuits, you bet you. >> i knew it. i knew you were going there right away, professor, so here's what i'd like to do. i want to run a commercial break. i want to come back, and i'm going to play for you a couple of very specific things that he said that the layperson might think just sounded like commentary. but the lawyer or the law professor would say, aha, they got h
. that's the word that we are hearing from law enforcement officials, federal law enforcement officials here in d.c. it is a big change from four years ago because four years ago, there were rising threats. there were also nearly 2 million people descending on the city and there were some real fears about what could happen there is still concern and still been game planning every possible scenario, but is there a different tone to the security this time. a, because you've got much fewer people coming. i mean, maybe 600, 700,000 people coming out here. that's big drop from the 1.8 million we saw. it's allowed them to make some changes. some of the bridges from virginia into the city that were closed to you and me last time so that police and all the buses could use them, those will be open. it will be easier access into the city and they learned a lot from last time. so, the secret service is now on twitter. they are going to be putting out updates to help people get around and get people the information they need. so maybe they don't run into as many security problems as you had last ti
control, for parking, for what have you. and we have about 2,000 individuals from law enforcement agencies, all over of this side of the united states. they try to get people to come close because they can drive in. so those are the numbers. now, what are they going to be doing? certainly trying to keep the crowd safe. but it's also important to say the authorities here are expecting the crowd to be about one-third to one-half the size of the crowd when president obama was naug rainaugurated th time. the trick is to try to stay invisible and not make it look like a police state. we know both at the republican and democratic national conventions there were so many security personnel, they kind of overwhelmed the place and it was perhaps a little too much, not just for the locals but also for the national audience. >> joe johns, thanks very much. >> thank you so much, joe. it's not just inauguration weekend, it's also the martin luther king holiday weekend. to mark that, thousands of people are taking part in a national day of service today. including the first family, obamas helped fix up a
president obama, a constitutional law professor and chief justice of the supreme court john roberts should have known like the back of their hands. but the mistake made for an awkward moment in the middle of a solemn occasion. the swearing in of the first african-american president in front of a crowd more than a million strong on the national mall. robe robert's flub was significant enough that the oath had to be taken again. the very next day at the white house. >> i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states. >> reporter: cnn senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin wrote an entire book about this awkward moment in presidential history titled "the oath." did they need to do it, again? >> no one knows. >> really? >> to this day because the legal significance of the oath remains kind of a mystery. so, they just said, look, someone could file a lawsuit, someone could make trouble. we don't want to spend the first week, the first month of the obama presidency litigating whether he is president. so, let's just do it. it's slightly embarrass, it's slightly weird. we'll do
to citizenship for some of those law abiding -- otherwise law abiding illegal immigrants in this country. so he's looking at sort of this overall comprehensive package, and the president and his advisors feel like they could make some movement on it in the second term. why? well, you look at who supported the president in the 2012 election. he got more than 70% of the hispanic votes. republicans realize that and you're starting to hear sort of this warming up to the idea to do something about immigration, immigration reform. and so, you know, the president had promised in his first campaign that he was going to make movement on this, did not deliver the way that some hispanics had expected him to do. they're hopeful that in his second term that can happen. >> dan lothian you just used the words warming up, and i know that you got the assignment outside of the national cathedral today and it is bitterly, bitterly cold. i want you to tell me a little bit about the warmth and love inside that cathedral. we're looking at more of the live pictures. this is an awesome event. people may forget it's an
for gay and lesbian couples, to show his support and the administration's support for repealing the law. immigration reform is obviously a hot topic right now. >> absolutely. >> we have nine states that now allow equal marriage, plus the district of columbia. but there are also countries around the world that allow marriage equality. there are many, many binational couples across the country. we want to make sure -- across the world. excuse me. but if you are in a same-sex couple and your partner is not a u.s. citizen, you can't get your partner near the united states legally. we want to make sure that binational couples are included in any type of immigration reform. >> there's been some controversy during this presidential transition when it comes to gay issues. of course the president's first pick to lead a prayer of the nation was a pastor who received controversy remarks. what do you make of this? is this a sign of things to come, do you think? >> well, it is. i mean, i think it's a sign of what has been happening also within the gay community. and chuck hagel is a great example. h
and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> it's interesting the president chose this time to make his strongest stand, because as you know, dan, the supreme court will take up same-sex marriage in march. >> reporter: that's right. carol, i don't think it should be too much of a surprise because recall over the first term, much of the first term the president was evolving on this issue of gay marriage, only in may that the president finally come out in support of same-sex marriage and so i don't think we should be too surprised by that. this apparently is a continuation of that evolution, and one interesting point is we're here at the washington national cathedral here in washington for the prayer service, as you pointed out. this is a church that less than two weeks ago came out saying that they would support same-sex marriages and taking part in the service today an openly gay pastor, reverend nancy wilson, she will be, along with others, offering prayers for the pre
for the presidential inauguration and you might be asking, why do we do it, other than it is the law. wendy walsh is a human behavioral psychologist, and wendy, you say there is a bit of a fine line here. we americans walk during an inauguration, right? >> reporter: it's true, don. i think that we struggle with the idea of having this kind of inauguration, because it feels a lot like a coronation. and that's what america sort of fought very hard to get away from. we left the monarchy. many, many years ago. but yet we want to have some pump, some circumstance. we want to talk about michelle's dress. we want to know who designed it. i honored her today by cutting my own bangs to match her new haircut, and i'm sure half the women in america -- >> i know about this. >> hey, don, bangs is the new botox, that's all i can say. i think that we want to have some pomp and pageantry, but want to be clear, this is an inauguration, the beginning of a second presidential term. this is not the king and queen. got it? >> yeah. okay. so by the way, the bangs look good. you always look great. this sort of ritual,
on the national mall. great to see you this morning. >>> not just law enforcement gearing up for tomorrow's festivities. >> that was good advice for chris. >>> cell phone providers are getting up on the action stepping up coverage to keep you connected. how do they do it? here's a hint for you, cows. >> cows? >> we'll explain. officemax can help you drive supply costs down... and down. use your maxperks card and get a 10-ream case of officemax multiuse paper for just 4.99 after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. britta olsen is my patient. i spend long hours with her checking her heart rate, administering her medication, and just making her comfortable. one night britta told me about a tradition in denmark, "when a person dies," she said, "someone must open the window so the soul can depar
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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